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Posts Tagged ‘Iowa’

My friend, Gail, sent me a link to a website called Collector’s Weekly.   In particular, the link related to the popular tradition of the 1950’s of individual town and state postcards.  Those were the days when the average person did NOT log onto Cheapair and find tickets to fly to Yellowstone Park or to Grandma’s house in Texas.  People drove!  I remember the trips my parents took sightseeing to Canada and to Florida and elsewhere.  My Dad was fond of the practice of putting decals on the windows of the car depicting a place or town or state. Photos of those collectibles another day.  

I scrolled through the many beautiful and colorful postcards, what a sweet trip down nostalgia lane.  It was hard to pick out only 10, they were so creative and cute.  

Here’s an excerpt from the article: “From the 1930s through the 1950s, tourists taking their first road trips in their newfangled automobiles would frequently stop along the way to pick up a few colorful postcards to mail to the folks back home. The most popular form of eat-your-heart-out greeting was the large-letter postcard, which had been around since the first part of the 20th century but whose heyday was during what we know today as the linen-postcard era. Made of textured paper rather than actual cloth, linen postcards were printed by companies such as Curt Teich & Company of Chicago, Tichnor Brothers and Colourpicture of Boston, E.C. Kropp of Milwaukee, Beals Litho & Printing of Des Moines, and Dexter Press of Pearl River, New York, among many others. Their souvenir postcards for states, cities, military bases, and tourist attractions were usually heralded at the top by the words “Greetings From,” below which were large, blocky, dimensional letters filled in with illustrations or photographs of the destination’s most scenic or noteworthy sights.”

I actually picked 11 and here they are:

Alaska

The 1942 Cards Were Not Big Sellers, So The Retailer Threw Them Out Creating Instant Scarcity

The Bigger The Letters The More Graphic The Depiction Could Be Inside and Out

The Bigger The Letters The More Graphic The Depiction Could Be Inside and Out

Early On Sun Valley Was Promoted As A Ski Destination

Early On Sun Valley Was Promoted As A Ski Destination

It's Not Clear That Rawlins Was A Metropolis But The Rope Borders On The Letters  Is A Nice Touch

It’s Not Clear That Rawlins Was A Metropolis But The Rope Borders On The Letters Is A Nice Touch

The City of Pontiac Michigan Takes Its Name From the Native American Tribe Who Lived There Before the Arrival of the Europeans

The City of Pontiac Michigan Takes Its Name From the Native American Tribe Who Lived There Before the Arrival of the Europeans

Here The Letters Of Niagra Falls Appear About To Tumble To Their Doom

Here The Letters Of Niagra Falls Appear About To Tumble To Their Doom

If This Card Had A Yellow Top and Blue Horses It Would Be Rare

If This Card Had A Yellow Top and Blue Horses It Would Be Rare

Big-Basin-

State Parks were popular destinations and cards such as this one could be sold in the Park gift shop.

There's No Question As To What Gulfport Has To Offer

There’s No Question As To What Gulfport Has To Offer

Quick - Name A Vegetable That's Grown In Iowa

Quick – Name A Vegetable That’s Grown In Iowa

Radiating  Bands of Color Were A Common Background

Radiating Bands of Color Were A Common Background

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Here’s 10 interesting facts that you can casually (and intentionally) drop into a conversation to impress your friends.   Did you know???

The snowboard was invented by an eighth grader from New Jersey?

In the days before toilet paper, Americans used corn husks and corncobs and the Japanese used sea weed?   

early American toilet paper

Please Don't Squeeze the Corn Husks

The world’s first ketchup was a green and brown paste made of squished up cucumbers, walnuts and mushrooms.

The average American spends nine years of his or her life watching television.

The first trampoline was thought up by an 11-year old George Nissen while watching a circus show in hometown in Iowa in 1826.  While in high school, George invented a bouncing table.  To prove how high a person could jump on a trampoline, its inventor took along a kangaroo – and made sure he jumped higher than the animal in his demonstrations

For almost two centuries bread was the world’s only type of eraser.  It didn’t work very well, but was good enough, until the rubber eraser was invented.

Not until the 1920s did it become common in the United States to have separate public bathrooms for males and females.  Those for men were called Johns.  Those for women were called Janes.

3M company, George Fry

Post It Notes

Post It Notes were invented by 3 M employee, Art Fry.  He used some of his colleague’s strong but removable adhesive to stick a page marker in his hymnal.

That Jules Leotard, a French circus acrobat invented the leotard . It was said he was in love with himself!

The modern day lollipop was invented by George Smith of New Haven, CT in 1908.  He would put a ball of boiled sweets on a stick and he named it after a famous race horse of the day, Lolly Pop.      

lolly, pop. sucker,

Lollipop


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Sometimes you can walk through Greenwich Village and see some characters you just aren’t going to find on Maple Street in Iowa.  BUT, on Halloween, THEY ALL come out of the woodwork, the closet, and some look like they escaped from the Institute.  These are photos from previous annual  Greenwich Village Halloween Parades.

Nine Days to go…. I’m calling this series Wigs and Wings

white wings, Murray Head,

Wind Beneath My Wings

blue hair, Greenwich Village, Murray Head,

I'm Feeling So Blue Over You

Murray Head, Greenwich Village Halloween, Devil, Mummer

A Rogue Mummer

Yellow wig, Murray Head, Greenwich Village Halloween parade, diva

"Oh YES I AM"!

Eagle's wings, Greenwich Village Halloween parade, Murray Head, raptor

On Eagle's Wings

 

bikinis and wigs, Greenwich Village Halloween Parade, Murray Head

It Must Have Been Warm That Year

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